Episode Six: Civil Rights Reporting (Journalist)

Title

Episode Six: Civil Rights Reporting (Journalist)

Authors

Susan Neville

Files

Download Civils Rights Reporting (Journalist) Transcript.pdf (137 KB)

Streaming Media

Description

Wakefield began his journalism career as a civil rights reporter for The Nation, The Atlantic, Esquire, and The New York Times. After his coverage of the Emmett Till trial, he continued being fascinated by trials. “It was like reading a novel,” he explains in this episode. He talks about the James Jones From Here to Eternity trial and the Adam Clayton Powell tax evasion trial, and he talks about Dorothy Day, Norman Mailer, and William Buckley. In 1968 he wrote a longform piece about the Vietnam War, “Supernation at War and Peace” that came out as an entire issue of the Atlantic and was reprinted as a book. That reporting took him to San Francisco, where he spent time with his old New York friends Joan Didion and John Donne. During this reporting assignment, he interviewed Dean Rusk and Hubert Humphrey.

Publication Date

2020

City

Indianapolis, IN

Biographies

Guest: Dan Wakefield

Dan Wakefield is the author of nine nonfiction books, two memoirs, and five novels, including the best-sellers Going All the Way and Starting Over. He was a staff writer for The Nation, The Atlantic Monthly, and GQ. Bill Moyers called Dan’s memoir Returning, A Spiritual Journey, “one of the most important memoirs of the spirit I have ever read.” Of his book Island in the City: The World of Spanish Harlem, James Baldwin wrote: “Dan Wakefield has a remarkable combination of humility and tough-mindedness that makes these streets and these struggling people come alive.”

In addition to his own books, Dan Wakefield has taught writing at U Mass, the University of Iowa Writers Workshop, Boston University, Emerson College, the University of Illinois Journalism School and the graduate writing program at Florida International University.

Recently, he wrote the introductions to the Kurt Vonnegut Letters, If This Isn’t Nice What Is: The Graduation Speeches of Kurt Vonnegut, and Kurt Vonnegut, The Complete Stories. Born in Indianapolis, and a graduate of Shortridge High School, he returned to Indianapolis in 2011.

Host: Susan Neville

Susan Neville is the author of seven books of creative nonfiction and three collections of short stories. Her first collection of stories won the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction from the University of Georgia, her second the Richard Sullivan Prize from the University of Notre Dame Press, and the third the Catherine Doctorow Award for Innovative Fiction from FC2, an imprint of the University of Alabama Press. She holds the oldest endowed chair for a woman professor in the country, the Demia Butler Chair of English Language and Literature at Butler University.

Susan Neville will be producing and serving as host for the podcast.

Technical Support: Megan Grady-Rutledge of Butler University’s Center for Academic Technology.

Megan's background includes an AS in Broadcast Production from Vincennes University, a BA in Anthropology with a minor in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures from IU Bloomington, and an MA in English from Butler University. She has worked in higher education for the last fifteen years—first as an English instructor, later as an administrator in advising and registration, and now as an academic technology specialist and co-supervisor of Butler library’s Information Commons. Prior to her work at Butler, she spent five years focused on delivery of quality academic programs delivered in face-to-face, online, and blended modalities, with responsibilities in faculty development.

Acknowledgements

These podcasts were made possible by grants from Indiana Humanities, the Ayres Fund of Butler University, and the Demia Butler Chair Fund.

A Dominique Weldon, Rory Deshner Production

Episode Six: Civil Rights Reporting (Journalist)

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